British Venturers wowed by Pender scenes

September 24, 2014

“The land is just filled with all the wildlife; seals and things that we just wouldn’t see in England. It’s just so mind-blowing coming from a small country; it’s just amazing how big it is.”

I think the first time I realized how crazy people from other countries are about Canada’s wilderness if when I visited Whitehorse, Yukon a few years back. Now, Whitehorse is more the size of a town than it is even a small city but, to my surprise, some German tourists told me there is a direct airplane flight from a city in that country to the Yukon. Why? Because of the wilderness, I was told.

I am proud of Canada and think its wilderness is amazingly beautiful so I really enjoyed writing the following article:

Gulf Islands Driftwood– Pender Island Edition
August 2, 2000
British Venturers wowed by Pender scenes
by Tanya Lester

Fundraising for over two years has paid off in breathtaking views and adventures for a group of British Venturers who spent time on Pender Island over the weekend.

“It’s really excellent,” said Catherine Welby, an 18-year-old in the group, which is part of the Scouts and Guides organization. “The land is just filled with all the wildlife; seals and things we just wouldn’t see in England. It’s just so mind-blowing coming from a small country; it’s just amazing how big it is.”

To see the mountains in the distance while they were canoeing in traditonal long boats on Sunday afternoon was a treat for the young woman, who lives south of London

“When we first arrived it was raining and we thought this is like England,” Welsby continued. “But now the sun has come out, it seems just for us.”

The 27 young people, who ranged in age from 16 to 25, organized barn dances, washed lots of cars and served special Christmas dinners to come up with the money for the once-in-a-lifetime experience.

Bob Cooper of Cooper’s Landing explained the group learned to canoe and then went out on a day-trip to South Pender and Winter Cove on Saturna.

The three boats ranged from 26 to 37 feet in length and included the type that would have been used by European explorers and traders, as well as the Haida canoe.

On Sunday evening, the group was treated to story-telling by Pender carver Victor Reece.

The visitors were set to go whale-watching out of Victoria on Monday.

The 18-day trip began with a greeting from Squamish Nation members Cherly and Audrey Rivers at the Vancouver airport, according to Bob Cooper’s brother Chris, who put together the travel package through Wilderness Adventures.

Other activities will include a three-day hike on the Juan de Fuca trail, another three days in Garibaldi Park, rock climbing and mountain biking in Squamish, and white water rafting on the Thompson River.

There will also be a canoe journey down the Fraser River with a grand finale feast hosted by the Katzie’s First Nation.

The young people will spend their last night in Canada in the Katzie’s long house.

–END–

tealeaf.56@gmail.com
teareading.wordpress.com
To read the first posts in this blog, go to http://www.writingsmall.wordpress.com
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Confessions of a Tea Leaf Reader by Tanya Lester is available to be purchased from the author or going to the title and author name to read the first few pages and buy it at amazon.com
Tanya’s other books are: Dreams & Tricksters, Women Rights/Writers and Friends I Never Knew.

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